We get it.
Some bunion treatments come up short (literally).

Let’s face it. Home remedies aren’t solutions. And, while surgical correction is the best way to achieve relief, some bunion procedures can shorten and alter the look of your toe, that may cause pain and other foot-related issues down the road.1

The LapiFuse™ Bunion Procedure is a new type of bunion correction that not only reduces pain and improves mobility, but also protects the natural appearance of your foot and was designed to reduce the likelihood of recurrence (return of bunions).1

Lapifuse checks off every box.


About Dr. Steven M. Block, DPM

With over 22 years of experience, having performed more Lapifuse surgeries than any surgeon in the United States, Dr. Block is well versed and experienced in providing the most complete, thorough surgical approach to bunion surgery.

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To see if Lapifuse™ is right for you.

Your Questions: Answered

Q: What makes the LapiFuse procedure different from other bunion correction surgery options?
A:

Some bunion correction procedures require shortening of the toe and large incisions that can affect how the foot looks, while potentially creating new pain and leading to additional surgical procedures. The LapiFuse Bunion Procedure is designed to preserve toe length, reduce pain, and restore the natural appearance of the foot.1

Q: How long does the LapiFuse procedure take?
A:

The time required for the LapiFuse procedure is unique to each patient and surgeon. Generally, the LapiFuse procedure will take 45-60 minutes.

Q: What will my recovery look like?
A:

Recovery instructions may vary by surgeon. Results are specific to individual patients. During the first week after your procedure, it is generally recommended that you keep your foot elevated to heal. Then, 10 days post-operation, you may be placed in a bunion dressing and short walker boot. After 6 weeks, your doctor may remove the boot and you should be able to wear normal footwear. However, please consult your doctor on recovery instructions to ensure optimal healing.

Q: Will the procedure improve my mobility?
A:

Because the LapiFuse procedure preserves the joint movement of the big toe, it is specially designed to improve mobility, letting you get back to your active lifestyle. Typically, patients should be able to return to regular physical activity 6-7 weeks after their procedure. However, please consult your doctor on recovery instructions to ensure optimal healing. Recovery instructions may vary by surgeon. Results are specific to individual patients.

Q: When can I wear loose fitting, closed-toe shoes again?
A:

Typically, at 6-7 weeks, patients are allowed full weight bearing in loose fitting closed toe shoes. Again, your doctor will provide you with recovery instructions to ensure optimal healing.

Q: Is it possible for my bunions to return after surgery?
A:

Surgical correction of bunions seeks to address the underlying structural causes of bunions and the LapiFuse procedure is specially designed with compression technology to reduce the likelihood of recurrence (return of bunions) However, recurrence is a possibility and, to reduce that risk, be sure to comply fully with all your doctor's recovery instructions.2

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To see if Lapifuse™ is right for you.

It is a common misconception that bunions are simply a cosmetic concern; an ugly “bump” on the foot. In fact, bunions are the result of an unstable metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint; as the big toe moves inward, the head of the metatarsal begins to stick out.

Aside from visual concerns, bunions can cause ongoing pain and inhibit mobility. If left untreated, bunion deformities can worsen and cause greater pain and further limit movement.

Symptoms of Bunions

  • A bulging bump on the outside of the base of your big toe
  • Swelling, redness, or soreness around your big toe joint
  • Corns or calluses — these often develop where the first and second toes rub against each other
  • Ongoing bunion pain or pain that comes and goes
  • Limited movement of the big toe

Main Causes of Bunions

  • Heredity. The tendency to develop bunions might be the result of an inherited problem with the structure or anatomy of your foot.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. Having this inflammatory condition can make you more likely to develop bunions.
  • Ill-fitting shoes. People who wear shoes that are too tight, too narrow or too pointed are more likely to develop bunions.
  • High heels. Wearing high heels forces your toes into the front of your shoes, often crowding your toes, making minor to moderate bunions more severe.
Book a Consultation
To see if Lapifuse™ is right for you.

Know Your Treatment Options

Non-surgical options

Used for less severe bunions

  • Pain medications such as aspirin and ibuprofen
  • Shoes with wider toe boxes to relieve pressure on and between toes
  • Shoe inserts such as pads and arch supports
  • Steroid injections into the big toe joint

Surgical options

For less severe to moderately severe bunions

  • Soft tissue correction: Usually done in combination with bone alignment (osteotomy). Procedure can shorten the loose tissues and lengthen the tight ones to create a balance in the soft tissues around the big toe.

For severe bunions

  • Osteotomy: Procedure involves smaller cuts to the bones in the foot to realign the joint. Once cut, the doctor fixes the break with pins, screws, and plates, making the bones straighter and the joint balanced.
  • Arthrodesis: Procedure involves removing the arthritic joint surfaces and inserting screws, wires, or plates to hold the surface together until healed.
  • Bumpectomy: Procedure involves removing the bump from the toe joint. Usually performed in combination with soft tissue procedures, but rarely corrects the cause of bunions and does not prevent the bunion deformity from returning.
Book a Consultation
To see if Lapifuse™ is right for you.

Individual results and activity levels after surgery vary and depend on many factors including age, weight and prior activity level. There are risks and recovery times associated with surgery and there are certain individuals who should not undergo surgery. Only a physician can tell you if this product and associated procedure are right for you and your unique circumstances. Please consult with a physician for complete information regarding benefits, risks, anticipated implant duration and possible outcomes.

1. Walker, Harris. Foot Ankle Clin N Am vol. 24 (2019) 641–648
2. Galli, et al. JFAS vol. 54 (2015) 437–440.

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